Jordan

We arrive in a "Ben Hur" chariot; drive to Wadi Rum; talk to Bedouins,; tour the great desert which hid Lawrence of Arabia, who helped the Arab Army defeat the Turks. We finish near ancient Petra.

About the Show

“If you fell, would the canopy break your fall?” Stanley Siegel asks, dangling in a harness high above the jungle floor. “No,” his Costa Rican host shrugs, “if you fall it’s bye-bye.” And with a shove Stanley is off, shooting through the treetops on a zip line, his cameraman doing his best to keep up.

Stanley Siegel is a retired broadcaster—known to millions for his groundbreaking and often controversial interviews on WABC—and with Stanley On The Go he single-handedly redefines the travel show. Indeed, he redefines the notion of adventure: you don’t have to be a young Olympian to have a zest for life. Experience shouldn’t—and doesn’t—end at 60. Stanley shows that there’s more to retirement than bingo and shuffleboard on the Lido deck. He’s an inspiration.

Stanley takes us headlong around the globe: whether he’s on a camel in Giza, the deck of a Navy aircraft carrier off San Diego, straddling a speeding motorbike through the streets of Moscow, or balancing on top of the Sydney Harbor Bridge, each episode is a tour de force with a force of nature. Stanley is irrepressible—his commentary is not only informative and enlightening, but is also often surprising and frequently irreverent. He shows us the iconic sights—the Grand Tour—but also uncovers the unexpected.

In Paris he shows us the Eiffel Tower, but the Eiffel Tower through the eyes of Guy de Maupassant. He also takes us for a tour of the fifty-thousand-bottle wine cellar at Hotel George V, on a boat trip down the Seine, and even gets performance tips from exotic dancers at the Crazy Horse. In Tokyo we see not only to the Imperial Palace and the Cherry Blossom Festival, but also a Sumo wrestling class, the teeming Tsukiji fish market at daybreak, and inside the Saguwa Express, Japan’s version of FedEx. He interviews Geisha girls, shows us the difference between shabu shabu and sukiyaki, and eventually winds up in the mosh pit of a Japanese punk rock show.

Stanley has a deft and beguiling talent for getting people to talk, honed by his years hosting his talk show on WABC. He is funny, real, personable—people open up to him. He’s informal yet thorough, managing to balance the playful with the erudite. But, above all else, he’s entertaining.

Stanley On The Go has a charm, an accessibility, a casual approach that immediately draws the viewer in. Whether it’s investigating an arranged marriage in India or hoisting a beer stein in Munich, dodging bulls on the streets of Pamplona or rafting through rapids in Brazil, he does it all with a spirit of adventure, a world of knowledge at his disposal, and an infectious sense of humor. Stanley asks the questions that viewers would ask—and some that they would never dream of asking. Stanley On The Go is like seeing the world with a friend; a friend who’s willing to try anything and has an uncanny nose for the unusual.

About the Host

Stanley Siegel

Stanley Siegel has been an unforgettable media presence for over three decades. In the 1970s and 80s his uncompromising talk show on WABC ensured that he was a defining personality of the New York airwaves. He interviewed everyone who defined the era, from Truman Capote to Frank Zappa, from Patti Smith to Renee Richards. His approach was no holds barred, opinionated, and fearless—he made it personal.

Stanley challenged the expectations of what a talk show could and should be and broadened the boundaries of the genre. He regularly brought on his therapist and underwent treatment on-air. In one infamous show he physically restrained Timothy Leary to prevent him from leaving. His 9 a.m. show provoked and delighted in equal measure.

After graduating from the University of Arizona, Stanley started as a newspaperman and even did a tour of duty in Vietnam as a radio journalist. He moved into television at WULT in Green Bay and his idiosyncratic talents were quickly recognized. Soon he was entertaining viewers in Louisville, San Diego, and New York. He has never played it safe: once was fired from a news broadcast for immersing himself in the “largest Jell-O mold in the continental United States.” Stanley came out of retirement bringing his intrepid style to Stanley On The Go, he has travelled the globe with the show and is now in production with RLTV on a series of specials to compliment the exclusive launch of Stanley On the Go on RLTV.

When not on the go, Stanley lives in Los Angeles.

Video Clips